Archive

  • Exodus Haiti

    A REVERSE MIGRATION TO THE COUNTRYSIDE AFTER HAITI’S EARTHQUAKE IN 2010 KILLED OVER 160,000 AND DISPLACED 1.5 MILLION

  • A woman departs Port Au Prince on a bus headed to Les Cayes with only a few belongings.
  • The Bare Walls of one of the finest dining restaurants in Port Au Prince remain exposed after the walls collapsed during the earhquake.
  • A fire burns the remains of a bed in the ruins of a house where nine people were killed in the neighborhood of Savin Pistach, Port Au Prince. Many of those in the neighborhood are saving money to migrate into the countryside after the earthquake devastated the city of Port Au Prince.
  • Jn. Rene' Rosenbert from Les Cayes finds salvation at a church service in Fonfrede. Jn. Rene has many family members who have come to live with him from the city after loosing everything in the earthquake.
  • Rose Francoise Duperval in her hospital bed in Brnda hospital in Les Cayes. She cannot walk from a severe blow to the hip, has a broken arm and most likely will lose her left eye from injuries she sustained after her house in Port Au Prince collapsed on top of her during the earthquake. After leaving the hospital she will not return to Port Au Prince but rather go on to Dumay in the countryside where her family is from.
  • The soccer field in Fonfrede, Les Cayes, is now filled with many boys from Port Au Prince relocating to the countryside after having lost everything in the earthquake.
  • A fire burns, carbonizing wood, in Les Cayes along the dry river. Deforestation is a large problem in Haiti, as trees are used for carbon production, the only option for fire burning in a country where having a stove is a shear luxury and out of reach of most households. Many local environmental groups are fighting strongly for replanting schemes, which is the only feasible answer to the problem.
  • 30 family members, most of whom have migrated to Les Cayes from Port Au Prince after the earthquake, share this damaged one room house, sleeping on the floor, and the ground outsdie.
  • A building lies in ruins in Jacmel with only it's balcony pillars intact.
  • Marie Lourde Bernadette Santa in her families house in Les Cayes sustained serious stomach injuries during the earthquake which toppled her house in Port Au Prince. She cannot walk, or digest food, and has lost extreme amounts of weight since the earthquake had struck 3 weeks prior. She is currently taking tree medicine anecdotes as she is unable to travel on the gravel road to the hospital for treatment.
  • Gravesites old and new mark the front lawn of the Saint-eyr family home in Les Cayes in the countryside. The family lost many family members including 3 young sisters, of 12, 20, and 24 years. Their parents came to Les Cayes to their extended families home having lost 3 of their dauters, the 4th was rushed to a hospital in Cap Haitian sustaining sever back injuries during the earthquake.
  • The donkey, an animal still very much used for hauling in the countryside of Les Cayes.
  • Mother and child eat with their hands by candlelight. 30 family members, most of whom have migrated to Les Cayes from Port Au Prince after the earthquake, share this damaged one room house, sleeping on the floor, and the ground outsdie.
  • A house in the mountains of La Vallee Jacmel, partially ruined in the earthquake was quickly repaired by the family who lost a son and daughter in law during the earhquake in Port Au Prince. The orphaned daughter of the couple, just shy of two years old is now considered a burden, another mouth to feed in a family that has not enough.
  • Cockfighting is a popular sport in Haiti and especially so in the countryside. Two cocks go at it in a ring alongside the ocean in Miragoane.
  • Children pray in Sunday Baptist church in Fonfrede, the weight of the world on their shoulders. Many children coming from Port Au Prince to live with extended family in the countryside have difficulty to go to school as they are already full, however the community leaders are organizing the schools to host children who have migrated, to attend classes at night. With no paved roads school attendance is still very difficult and out of reach for many children.
  • A church originally damaged in a sea storm lays completely in ruins after the devetating earthquake in Miragoane.
  • The earthquake victim ward inside the General Hospital of Les Cayes. Many Haitians who were injured in the earthquake in Port Au Prince were sent out to Les Cayes to receive medical attention as all the hospitals in the city were working at full capacity and were overcrowded.
  • The head of a slaughtered pig lies outside of the kitchen hut of a poor family in Miragoane. As the family swells with members flowing in from Port Au Prince the pig will sustain the family for 2 months, as each part is used carefully to prepare various dishes.
  • A dinning room chair transported from a family who lost their home in Port Au Prince. They now live in the gazebo in the yard of extended family in Cayes Jacmel.
  • A young girl, destined to become a Restevek in the countryside of Miragoane. Many resteveks, considered modern day slaves are returning to the countryside from Port Au Prince where they had originally migrated for the possibility of a better life and despite the extremely difficult conditions of the restevek lifestyle, were still better off as slaves than with a mother who can not feed them. The earthquake sheds new possibility for the extinction of this illegal and abusive practice.
  • Giselle Etiene (center) and others wait anxiously for a food ration handout, outside the doors of an abandoned school, taken over with makeshift tents in the the Savan Pistach neighborhood of Port Au Prince. Many inhabitants of these improvised tent cities and many who are sleeping on the streets are saving up money to migrate into the countryside.
  • Young boys at the Kad Timoun Nan Sid orphanage in Fonfrede Les Cayes playing the horns. David Dorval the director of the orgnization which takes in boys with no family, feeding and housing them, also schools the boys, by way of music, theatre, etc. David has already taken in 10 boys who lost their families in the earthquake and would like to take in more however he has lost his original funding as all concentration has gone towards the city of Port Au Prince.
  • Ralf and Morceany Pierre-Saint, young albino brothers sit in their damaged house in the hills of Le Vallee Jacmel. The two were abandoned by their mother at an early age who did not want the burden of caring for them and are cared for by their loving father who has taken in 15 extra family members from Port Au Prince to the two room home, as they have no place to go.
  • Port Au Prince workers in Cayes Jacmel unload flour off of a boat imported from the Dominican Republic to be sold on the black market. Black Market agriculture remains a major impediment for an honest agricultural industry to broaden in the countryside of Haiti.
  • Dada takes a ride down the water irigation trough in Petitguave after bathing. The area was hit hard during the earthquake and has many people migrating in from Port Au Prince as well. The running water was implemented for agricultural purposes however with no running water in their houses the people use the manmade stream to bath and wash clothes.
  • The house of Ronald Joanuel in the Savan Pistach neighborhood of Port Au Prince is taken over by pigeons after he took his family to live in his unfinished one room countryside house in Miragoane.
  • Dordy Liberus and Jeanne Henry back bread in their home bakery in the countryside of Petitguave. Basic food is not lacking in this region however families have little money to buy it and with little to no opportunities for work many do not have the means to buy even a loaf of bread.
  • Women improvise a prayer on the streets of Petitquave at 6 in the morning.
  • Fisherman take early to the sea in Cayes Jacmel. They are now more important than ever, helping to sustain swelling families of migrants from Port Au Prince.